#GLS14 Session 1 :: Bill Hybels – Hard Fought Leadership Lessons

Bill Hybels

Bill Hybels is the founding and senior pastor of Willow Creek Community Church in South Barrington, Illinois, and the chairman of the board for Willow Creek Association. He convened The Global Leadership Summit in 1995, following a God-given prompting to help raise and develop the spiritual gift of leadership for the local church.

Both visionary and passionate about seeing every local church reach its full God-given potential, he speaks around the world on strategic issues related to leadership, evangelism, and church growth. An exceptional communicator, he is a best-selling author of more than 20 books, including AxiomHoly DiscontentJust Walk Across the RoomThe Volunteer RevolutionCourageous Leadership, and The Power of a Whisper: Hearing God and Having the Guts to Respond.

Hard Fought Leadership Lessons

  • Everything that attars in this world rises and falls on leadership.
  • The future and well being rests primarily in the hands of the world’s leaders.
  • World peace rises and falls on leadership.
  • Building prevailing, enduring businesses rises and falls on leadership.
  • There is so much at stake today.
  • Humility is the supreme value of the Leadership Summit.
  • We must cultivate the capacity to learn from a wide array of other leaders.
  • All leadership is intensely spiritual – True.
  • Every decision you make as a leader has a direct effect on the spirit of those you lead.
  • Leaders by definition are visionaries. Leaders are gifted by God to see the future before anyone else can see it.
  • Then the vision begins to consume us. It becomes our identity. But if we’re not careful the condition of our team slowly falls to secondary importance.
  • Often leaders with the highest level of vision and passion have the lowest level of awareness of the spirit of the team.
  • “If they don’t care about the vision as much as they should, then I don’t need to care about their hearts as much as I should.”
  • Someone said to me one time, “I love our church, but sometimes I feel like a grunt.” A grunt feels invisible, and that their opinions don’t matter.
  • What God treasures most are people…even more than visions.
  • The most satisfying accomplishment of my last 20 years is the transforming of our culture at Willow.
  • What practical steps are required to turn a culture around?
  • 5 key commitments that we made:
  • 1. Use an outside firm to help us change the culture.
  • 2. Our executive team had to really own this turnaround.
  • Your culture will only ever be as healthy as the senior leader wants it to be.
  • 3. Get real serious about training everyone on our staff who manages people.
  • It should be illegal to allow some people to manage other people. Some people just can’t do it.
  • People join organizations. They leave managers.
  • You will never reach your culture’s full vitality potential until every people manager leads well.
  • 4. Raise the level of candor in our performance reviews.
  • It is cruel and unusual punishment not to answer your team’s questions regularly.
  • The kindest form of management is the truth.
  • In meetings, don’t forget the 3 M’s:
  • What are trying to move ahead?
  • If it’s not moving, then modify the plan.
  • Motivate your people before the meeting ends.
  • Foster an environment of inspiration.
  • Start. Stop. Continue.
  • Continue to call the best out of your people.
  • Find the ways or the words that are so clear so that your team knows exactly what you’re talking about.
  • We have a ruthless commitment to resolving relational conflict regardless of how bad it feels.
  • What if we all looked at conflict as an opportunity to strengthen a relationship?
  • In the average christian organization only 54% of the employees are truly engaged in their work.
  • 19% of our staff feel either under-challenged or disconnected from the exciting work that God is doing at our church.
  • Great leadership is by definition relentlessly developmental.
  • So many leaders have secretly concluded that developing leaders is vague, and they give up.
  • What best develops leaders?
  • 1. Put them in high challenge roles.
  • 2. Assign them to a short-term task force.
  • 3. Offer them realtime feedback.
  • 4. Provide them with coaching and mentoring.
  • 5. Offer them classroom sessions and seminars.
  • Success and failure must both be possible.
  • The emerging leader must work with a wide variety of leaders.
  • The task must involve real pressures and must have a deadline.
  • The end product and performance must be evaluated by a senior leader.
  • When developing leaders you must look at how resourceful they are.
  • Resourcefulness is the most essential weapon in a leader’s arsenal.
  • Before you put any emerging leader in a role, you must ascertain that they know what they’re supposed to do.
  • No senior leader can possibly know enough right now to be equipped to handle what is going to come at them in the future.
  • A real shepherd actually cares about the sheep. And they have a long-term view of caring for the sheep.
  • Find and develop leaders with a legacy mindset.
  • Prevailing organizations cannot be built on the shoulders of leaders with short-term mindsets.
  • Legacy leaders are the only ones willing to pay the price to fix a broken culture.
  • Legacy leaders want to please the God they love. They want to give their one and only life to a cause bigger than themselves.
  • We each only get one shot at this thing we call life. Our lives will be represented by that dash between the two dates on our gravestone.
  • You can live and lead small. You can live and lead safe and selfishly. Or you can choose to pursue a grander vision that God will reveal to you.
  • I’ve never seen one person drift into a legacy leader. The drift is always into safety and comfort.
  • Enough of playing safe. It’s time for a grander vision.
  • This is the one and only life you get to live out. Please don’t go to your grave without chasing a life that leaves something beautiful behind.
  • Have you given any thought to what your legacy will be?
  • James 1:12, blessed are those who persevere through trials.
  • Legacy-making does come with a price tag. The grander the vision, the greater the price tag.
  • Develop an endurance strategy.
  • If you pursue solitude, you can learn to hear the voice of God in an un-rushed way.
  • Have you ever felt exhausted and discouraged? It’s a terrible feeling.
  • If you’re exhausted, ask for help. Humble yourself and admit that this is going to take some assistance.
  • You might be one prayer away from a divine rescue.

Tags: , , ,