Measuring Success for Social Media in Your Church

Why is it that in the church we can become so obsessed with numbers? We convince ourselves that it is the only concrete way to measure succcess within the church.  It’s especially easy to get caught up in the nunbers game when it comes to the web and social media.

It is easy to equate “Likes” and Followers, and retweets with success. These are helpful elements to observe in a church’s overall social media strategy, but don’t base success on numbers of followers, “Likes”, retweets, or anything else. When we begin to base our success on these things then we begin to forget about why we are using social media in the first place. It is easy to forget about the people that we’re actually interacting with, and we forget about providing value for them, and helping them connect with each other and with God. All of these things can get lost when we turn these people into numbers. Numbers that we convince ourselves need to get bigger in order for our church’s social media presence to be successful.

But what does success actually look like in social media in the church?

Success could look like… The single mom who reads your sermon quote on Facebook about calling on strength from God and it reminds her to pray that day.

Success could also look like… The father who reads your tweet of Proverbs 23:24 about raising a wise son and is encouraged to talk to his son today.

You see, success in social media in the church is hard to measure because we’re not selling a product. We don’t have concrete sales numbers.

But we have God and we have people. We have people that we are striving to connect with each other and ultimately connect in a relationship with God. If we ever lose sight of these people then we’ll get caught in a numbers game, and that is a game that is not worth playing.

This may seem discouraging when a church is first starting out online because we want to see results immediately. Unfortunately the results we get probably won’t be visible immediately, but that doesn’t mean they’re not there. I receive emails, comments, and replies on a weekly basis from people being encouraged and spurred on towards growth because of something they interact with through one of our social media platforms at Park. These stories are a good measuring stick of success for social media in the church. Also these stories may take a while to surface in your church, but they will, and when they do be sure to capture them and share them.

Social media in the church is about people, and connecting those people with each other, and ultimately with God. If we’re doing this then the numbers will follow.

Do you agree or disagree?

How are you measuring success for social media in your church?

Tags: , , , ,

Comments

  1. Great post. Social Media isn't the goal it is the relationships. I think of Paul's Ministry when I think of Social Media. Before Rome there was not a good travel system and there was a more challenging language structure and trade system. Before social media it was not as easy to get a massive interactive audience together. The channels for sharing the Gospel are there yet the harvesters are still few. Thanks Josh for your insight.

  2. Josh Burns says:

    Love this analogy Jordan. Keep up the good work!

  3. Josh Burns says:

    How should we measure success in social media in the church? Here are my thoughts – http://t.co/0u1XuOmL

  4. Josh Burns says:

    Don't base your church's social media success on numbers. Don't lose sight of the people and connecting them with God – http://t.co/YR5uSnub

  5. Don't base your church's social media success on numbers. Don't lose sight of the people and connecting them with God – http://t.co/YR5uSnub

  6. bobbygilles says:

    RT @jburno: How should we measure success in social media in the church? Here are my thoughts – http://t.co/dxYlVOFj // good post!

  7. Don't base your church's social media success on numbers. Don't lose sight of the people and connecting them with God – http://t.co/YR5uSnub

  8. How should we measure success in social media in the church? Here are my thoughts – http://t.co/0u1XuOmL

  9. RT @jburno: How should we measure success in social media in the church? Here are my thoughts – http://t.co/eiEWuAUw // good post!

  10. Don't base your church's social media success on numbers. Don't lose sight of the people …. http://t.co/RJjizOHO
    Via @jburno

  11. Don't base your church's social media success on numbers. Don't lose sight of the people and connecting them with God – http://t.co/YR5uSnub

  12. Tonya Burns says:

    Agree! I Co. 3: 7 reminds us that God is the one who gives the increase. When we keep our focus on Him, He will take care of the numbers as He sees fit!

  13. we are his instrument, HIS child, to each one do our part on our journey…..seeking to do the Father's will……God will do the rest.

  14. …I apply the 'I must decrease so God can increase' model when doing marriage counseling…a 'servanthood model' that if we are decreasing in our selfish/prideful ways the other then must increase…both partners focusing on the others emotional and physical needs will result in a fulfilled marriage…. "Because I love you, I will serve you…..' …see, I'm not a total lost cause!!! hahahaha

  15. Josh Burns says:

    Thanks for that Scripture mom! Stay centered on Him and he'll take care of the rest. Love you!

  16. Don't base your church's social media success on numbers. Don't lose sight of the people and connecting them with God – http://t.co/YR5uSnub

  17. Base your church's social media success on people. Don't get hung up on numbers: http://t.co/5qLQsxKH KH

  18. Phil Maylor says:

    Base your church's social media success on people. Don't get hung up on numbers: http://t.co/5qLQsxKH KH

  19. Base your church's social media success on people. Don't get hung up on numbers: http://t.co/5qLQsxKH KH

  20. […] Measuring Success for Social Media in Your Church It is easy to equate “Likes” and Followers, and retweets with success. These are helpful elements to observe in a church’s overall social media strategy, but don’t base success on numbers of followers, “Likes”, retweets, or anything else. When we begin to base our success on these things then we begin to forget about why we are using social media in the first place. It is easy to forget about the people that we’re actually interacting with, and we forget about providing value for them, and helping them connect with each other and with God […]

  21. Base your church's social media success on people. Don't get hung up on numbers: http://t.co/5qLQsxKH KH

  22. RT @cmsucks: Base your church's social media success on people. Don't get hung up on numbers: http://t.co/JXMFCOaH KH

  23. RT @cmsucks: Base your church's social media success on people. Don't get hung up on numbers: http://t.co/JXMFCOaH KH

  24. RT @cmsucks: Base your church's social media success on people. Don't get hung up on numbers: http://t.co/JXMFCOaH KH

  25. MT @NewMediaAtUnion: MT @cmsucks: Base your church's social media success on people not numbers: http://t.co/d9UDSxQm

  26. Great article Josh, and you hit the nail on the head. We aren't selling anything, but we are commissioned with the greatest call to action that has ever been: to go forth and make disciples of all nations. The root of that is communication. We have to use each and every tool available to that end and use it to the best of our ability. You might have some insight on a recent post of mine as well. Love to have you share your thoughts: http://www.254marketing.com/would-jesus-have-had-a-facebook/.

  27. Great article on measuring #socialmedia success in our #church. Are we being effective? http://t.co/PVrROkB6

  28. Josh Burns says:

    totally agree! Thanks. Let's go do it! I'll check out your post :)

  29. Steve Kenow says:

    "Measuring" social media success in your church http://t.co/Pkk0l0uL #chsocm via @jburno

  30. […] Develop real world goals – You’re more than likely going to be working with someone else in your church to create a campaign for their event or ministry. So instead of being on your own when it comes to planning everything, it’s good to have someone else communicate to you or at least help you develop goals for the event. This may be a certain number of people attending, or a certain amount of money given, or an amount of awareness raised, etc. Usually these are real world goals that the person has for the event or ministry, then later you can develop online goals, such as clicks, shares, “Likes”, retweets, etc. But I will warn you from the start, be very careful when developing these online goals, because many times these are hard to track in the church, and can be very distracting. […]

  31. […] Develop real world goals – You’re more than likely going to be working with someone else in your church to create a campaign for their event or ministry. So instead of being on your own when it comes to planning everything, it’s good to have someone else communicate to you or at least help you develop goals for the event. This may be a certain number of people attending, or a certain amount of money given, or an amount of awareness raised, etc. Usually these are real world goals that the person has for the event or ministry, then later you can develop online goals, such as clicks, shares, “Likes”, retweets, etc. But I will warn you from the start, be very careful when developing these online goals, because many times these are hard to track in the church, and can be very distracting. […]

  32. […] Recently I’ve been thinking about what it means for a church to go from a non-existent web presence, to creating a well-oiled social media and web presence. Many times a church wants to see immediate results. I fall into that trap as well. Social media almost begs immediate results, but those results may not come immediately, and you have to be okay with that. Gasp! Yes, I said it. You have to be okay with not seeing immediate results. I talk more about what defines ‘results’ in social media for a church here. […]

  33. […] Measuring Success for Social Media in Your Church – Josh Burns […]

  34. […] getting more “Likes” or followers. Yes, you should pay attention to the numbers, but it’s not all that matters. Check it […]

  35. […] times we shy away from numbers in the church, and for good reason. It’s very easy to get caught up in a numbers game, but so much of the […]

  36. Check out theBillionairesBrain.com – a Must have for every struggling entrepreneur..